First Aid Kit

You want to do the right thing and include a first aid kit in your workshop. The question is, what should you keep in it? Here's a list of must haves: Regular and elastic bandages, antiseptic ointment, cotton swabs and balls, a tweezers, eye drops, elastic bandages with first-aid tape, gauze, a chemical cold pack, and a first aid information handbook. Also a list of emergency phone numbers either right near the phone or in the first-aid box cover itself.
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Powertool Placement

Generally allow about 2-in. from the back of the tool to the wall, but be sure to leave space for any sawdust collection equipment you plan to install, including the ductwork and any attachments to it or to the tool.
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Portable Tools

Use caster sets to keep your major tools, even workbenches, portable. Wheeled tools and benches will allow you more flexibility, and will let you reposition for specific jobs like ripping long lumber or for taking advantage of natural daylight.
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Workshop Visibility

You can improve the visibility inside your workshop just by painting the walls and floors white. If your workshop is in the basement paint the sides of the window wells white too.
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Shop Cleaning

You can attach a length of soft copper tubing to extend the reach of a blow gun nozzle used with an air compressor. The extra length will allow you to clean out motors and interior machine parts without getting a face full of dust. The end of the tubing can be bent to reach around the back side of motors or into other hard-to-reach areas. Use a wet/dry vac along with the blow gun to help keep dust out of the shop.
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Nylon Solution

Worn-out nylons can be used to hold tools on pegboard if you run out of pegboard hooks or have something bulky to hang up. Knot up one end, then feed the nylon through the back, and then loop it through appropriate holes for the tools you want to hang. The nylons will stretch nicely to fit various tool shapes and will actually hold the larger tools more securely than the older-style pegboard hooks. This trick works best if you are able to gain access to the back of the pegboard.
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Optimizing Tool Storage

Imagine working on a project and having all the tools and parts you need right there. That's what you strive for when you storing and organizing your tool collection. Your tool storage equipment should provide you with these three important elements: Security from theft and loss. Protection from damage. Organization that allows for easy, fast access and mobility.
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Storing Screws & Nails

Over the coarse of a few projects, you can accumulate quite a collection of small screws, nails, and other small parts. There are several ways you can store these items; baby food jars, small paper bags, soup cans, or even a multi-drawer small parts organizer. The trick is to be able to quickly see what is inside each container without having to waste time searching. Using your hot glue gun, attach a sample of the small piece on the outside of the container. This will give you a quick, visual reminder of what's inside.
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Part Catchers

When making repairs or taking apart equipment, be prepared for the occasional dropped part. Clean off a section of your workbench and spread out a smooth shop or dish towel. The towel will keep errant small parts from rolling around on the floor and getting lost. For small jobs, even square shop rags will work; for larger jobs cover the bench with salvaged carpeting.
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Parts Finder

Once a small part gets lost in grass or on floors, you can waste a lot of time looking for it. To find it quickly, put a nylon stocking over the end of your shop vacuum hose and fasten it with a rubber binder. Turn on the vac and play it over the area where it might have gone. If the part is there the vac will suck it up and hold it on the nylon so you can just pick it off.
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