Cleaning Solvent

Use the right solvent to clean up paint equipment. Check the paint can label. Generally use a mild detergent solution for water-based paints, mineral spirits for alkyd enamels, mineral spirits or turpentine for oil paints, alcohol for shellac, and mineral spirits for varnish. When you are reusing solvent for cleaning equipment, occasionally rub some between your fingers. When it begins to feel sticky, dispose of properly.
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Paint Cleanup – Oil-Based

Oil-based (alkyd) paint must be removed from tools with brush cleaner or paint thinner. Pour the cleaning material into a clean bucket and rinse brushes and rollers well. When done, allow the solids to settle out of the cleaner, then strain the liquid back into the original container for reuse. Allow the settled solids to air-dry away from children, pets or open flames, then dispose of the container in the trash.
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Lead Dust

Lead dust can form when lead-based paint is dry scraped, dry sanded, or heated. Dust also forms when painted surfaces bump or rub together. Lead chips and dust can get on surfaces and objects that people touch. Settled lead dust can re-enter the air when people vacuum, sweep, or walk through it.
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Stripping Ventilation

Use paint strippers outdoors if possible. If you must use them indoors, cross-ventilate by opening all doors and windows. Make sure there is fresh air movement throughout the room. Ventilate the area before, during, and after applying and stripping. Never use any paint stripper in a poorly ventilated area. If work must be done indoors under low ventilation conditions, consider having the work done professionally instead of attempting it yourself.
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Painting Windows

When painting casement windows, make sure they are wide open. Paint the top, side, and bottom edges first, then finish with the crossbars, frames, casings, and sills. 1. For double-hung windows move each sash to the center of its track, and paint the inside sash, starting with the crossbars. Then, paint the frame. Don’t paint the top edge of the inside sash; you’ll use it to move the sash. Next, paint the top half of the outside sash, starting with the crossbar, then the frame. 2. Close the sashes to within several inches of the closed position. Paint the rest of the outer sash and the top edge of the inner sash. Paint the window casing, then the sill. 3. Paint the check rails. Move both sashes down as far as they will go, then paint the upper rails. Once the paint is thoroughly dry, move both sashes up and paint the lower rails of the window.
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Painting Temperature

When using latex be sure that the temperature is above 50 degrees F. It is difficult for latex to form a film at lower temperatures. With solvent-borne paint, be sure the temperature is at least 5 degrees above the dew point. If it isn't, water may condense on the surface as it cools while the solvent evaporates, causing an uneven blushing effect.
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Surface Prep

When paint fails, it�s usually caused by weak surface preparation. Spend time on a few basics before you begin to get the results you want when you�re done. Simply washing walls with detergent to remove dirt, grease, oil, and fingerprints can make all the difference. A clean everyday floor sponge mop makes a great wall washer. Be sure to rinse thoroughly and give everything adequate time to dry.
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