Painting Over Gloss

If you’re painting over an old semi-gloss paint, check to see if it has become hard and brittle. Try to pick off a piece from an obscure area with your fingernail. If it chips, it probably needs a light sanding to improve the “tooth” for a new coat of paint.
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Lead Dust

Lead dust can form when lead-based paint is dry scraped, dry sanded, or heated. Dust also forms when painted surfaces bump or rub together. Lead chips and dust can get on surfaces and objects that people touch. Settled lead dust can re-enter the air when people vacuum, sweep, or walk through it.
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Paint Tool Care

If you're going to paint again tomorrow, just wrap your brushes or rollers in plastic and set them aside in a cool place. If your painting chores are done, clean your tools thoroughly. Latex washes off tools and trays with warm water. Oil-based paint requires a thinner or mineral spirit. Wear plastic gloves and work the solvent into bristles or nap and rinse until the solvent is clear. Once dry, store brushes hanging bristles down in their original wrap or paper. Rollers should dry and store standing on end.
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Painting Windows

When painting casement windows, make sure they are wide open. Paint the top, side, and bottom edges first, then finish with the crossbars, frames, casings, and sills. 1. For double-hung windows move each sash to the center of its track, and paint the inside sash, starting with the crossbars. Then, paint the frame. Don’t paint the top edge of the inside sash; you’ll use it to move the sash. Next, paint the top half of the outside sash, starting with the crossbar, then the frame. 2. Close the sashes to within several inches of the closed position. Paint the rest of the outer sash and the top edge of the inner sash. Paint the window casing, then the sill. 3. Paint the check rails. Move both sashes down as far as they will go, then paint the upper rails. Once the paint is thoroughly dry, move both sashes up and paint the lower rails of the window.
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Painting Time

When painting a room which has surfaces that are in good shape, plan on spending about half as much time on preparation and clean-up as the actual painting. Where surfaces are in poor shape, non-painting time will increase accordingly, and may take more time than the paint application itself. To save time in cleaning up paint trays, either line them with aluminum foil before starting, or simply slip smaller trash bags over them.
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Perfect Painting Weather

As part of your pre-painting preparation, check the weather forecast. The perfect conditions for painting are a mild day with temperatures between 50 and 80 degrees, little or no wind, and low humidity. Avoid painting if rain or very high humidity is predicted within 24 hours. Stop painting early enough for the surface to dry before evening dew sets it.
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