Ironing Veneer

If you are gluing veneer to a wood surface, you can use an old clothes iron to help. First use a sponge to wet the face of the veneer so that it won't curl. Next, apply a thin film of glue to both the surface and the underside of the veneer. Then, when the veneer is dry to the touch, use the clothes iron at a high setting to secure the veneer in place.
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Level Check

Need to replace your trusty old level? You can check it for accuracy. Lay one working edge on a flat surface and check the bubble. Swap it end for end, then check the bubble again. It should be in the same position. Now try the opposite working edge. Take a reading, switch end for end, and take another reading. The bubble should be in the same position. Likewise check for plumb by holding it against a flat vertical surface.
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Miter Box Saver

If you just bought a manual miter box, a simple modification will extend its useful service life. Insert and fasten a piece of 1x stock to the inside bottom of the box. The saw blade will then cut into the false bottom, without damaging the miter box itself. Occasionally move the wood back and forth, or turn it over, to spread out the wear. When badly cut up, just replace the piece.
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No-Lump Paint

If you find lumps in a can of paint that you need, you can "push" them out. Cut out a circle from a piece of wire screen slightly smaller than the can's inside circumference. Put the screen circle on the surface of the paint. With a little help it will sink to the bottom of the can, taking the lumps with it. Another way to salvage lumpy paint is to strain it through an old nylon stocking.
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Part Pick-Up

If you will be building something which uses small parts produced on your tablesaw, you can let your shop vacuum pick up the pieces for you. It's fast, efficient, and safer than getting your hand close to the blade. Clean out the vac, then wire or clamp the suction hose so that the small pieces are drawn in as you do your cutting. Then, when you are done, simply open up the vac and collect the parts.
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Planer-Joiner

Professional woodworkers buy quality tools capable of precision adjustments. Two tools which give them a leg up are the thinckness planer and planer/joiner. If you don't have these tools to help make sure your stock is perfectly dimensioned, try to find someone who has them and will dress up your project lumber for you. Chances are good that the wood you buy from the lumberyard will not be precisely square and true, and will need further processing if you are building a project to critical dimensions.
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Tool Slips

Shop injuries often can happen when something is difficult to remove and excess pressure is applied. When using heavy force, especially with tools like a screwdriver or a needle-nose pliers, think ahead to what will happen if the tool slips off. If it could hit a part of your body, search for an alternative removal method.
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Removing a Banister

Here's how to disassemble a banister and balusters for refinishing. Using a block, gently separate the banister and newel post just enough to insert the blade of a reciprocating saw. Cut through the bolts and nails to detach the banister. Repeat this process on the opposite end. Then, carefully separate the pieces using the block. Be sure to number each piece for re-assembly later.
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Rough Surface Gluing

If you find irregular surfaces at the glue line in wood projects, the problem can be moisture levels. This can happen, for example, when one piece has a 15% moisture content, while those next to it are at 8%. If you glue and plane boards with unequal moisture, those with higher moisture will eventually shrink more than those with less moisture.
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Sheathing Cuts

Often carpenters will make quick work of cutting fiberboard sheathing by making their cut marks with a chalkline instead of a carpenter's pencil. Hook the end of the chalkline on one end, hold down the other end, and snap to make the line. The same idea can be used on other sheet material.
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