Naturalizing Bulbs

Naturalizing simply refers to a way of planting bulbs so they appear as though Mother Nature had done the planting. That is, instead of planting in evenly spaced rows, the bulbs are planted in large drifts, much as you would find plants in nature. One way to achieve this effect is to scatter a handful of bulbs, then plant them where they land. To create a bed that reblooms every year, choose bulbs that are naturally long-lasting and multiply freely, such as daffodils, grape hyacinths, and crocuses.
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Hardening Off

Before placing young plants in the garden they should be hardened off. Plants taken directly from the house to the garden almost always scorch from exposure to direct sunlight and wind. Scorched plants turn white or brown. Plants not killed will certainly be set back. Harden off seedlings by placing them outdoors for several hours on mild days. Select a shady, sheltered area at first. After several days provide some sun in gradually increasing amounts. Plants may be left outside at if temperatures are mild. Begin this process at least two weeks before the plants are to be set out in the garden.
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Which End Up

Most bulbs, including tulips and daffodils, should be planted with the pointed end up-this is where the leaves will emerge. Small, round bulbs can be planted in any direction. If in doubt, plant bulbs on their sides. This will make it easier for the leaves to grow up and the roots to grow down than if the bulb were planted completely upside down.
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Annuals vs. Perennials

Annuals complete their life cycle in one growing season. Seed germinates in the spring, the plant grows, flowers, produces seed and then dies. Perennials live for more than one growing season. There are two types of perennials. Herbaceous perennials generally die to the ground at the end of the growing season but send up new shoots the following spring. Woody perennials, such as trees and shrubs, do not die back to the ground but get larger each year.
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Growing Biennials

Biennials are started from seed the first year then they flower and die the second year. There are many exceptions to this description. Some biennials self seed so appear to be perennial. Others, such as pansy, are grown as annuals. The seed is usually started during the summer of the first year.
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Novice Gardening

The best advice for the novice gardener is to start small; a well prepared small garden will yield plenty of produce or ornamental beauty. As skills and confidence grow, gradually increase the garden's size to fit your time and energy commitments.
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Beware Backflow

When water flows backward through the water supply system, it is called backsiphonage or backflow. When that water is accidentally mixed with hazardous chemicals or bacteria, it is called dangerous! For this reason, never use spray attachments without a backflow prevention device. The chemicals used on your lawn are toxic and can be fatal if ingested.
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Construction vs. Plants

Several types of injury occur during construction. Those covered under other sections are grade changes and soil compaction. The other type of injury is mechanical injury to trunks. If the injury is minor, the tree will heal the wound with no difficulty. A major bark removal may kill some portion of the tree. Several wounds may girdle and kill a tree.
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