Sawing Posts

Say you're building a deck in your yard and have to cut a 10-in. thick post in half. How do you do this with a circular saw with just an 8-in. blade? Make matching straight cuts on opposite sides of the timber. Set the thickness guide to just over half the woods width.
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Drill Propeller

Shavings can pile up around a hole being drilled, making it hard for you to see what you are doing. To prevent this, push the point of the drill bit through a 4-in. strip of masking tape, then draw the tape up the bit so it will clear the work. Fold the strip lengthwise to bring the sticky sides together. The tape "wings" will act as a fan to clear the surface.
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Hacksaw Space

If you need to hacksaw through a fastened pipe or rod, but the space above is cramped, try this: Remove the hacksaw's blade, straddle the pipe with its frame from below, then reinstall the blade upside down. The teeth of the saw will cut through the pipe from the opposite side. In many cases this trick will allow you to complete a cut that would be otherwise impossible.
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Miter Support

When you cut longer pieces, miter saws are best used with supports on both sides. One way is to cut in a drop-down section into a bench for the saw. Another is to build up raised supports on both sides of the saw on top of the bench. An upright along the back of the supports will let you use a stop block for repetitive cuts.
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Pre-Drilling For Brass

On certain projects, you may be required to work with brass screws. While the brass results in an attractive finished project, it is a soft metal that can easily be scratched or damaged. The solution is to use your drill to create a pilot hole, then drive a regular steel screw of identical size into the hole. After the hold is created, remove the steel screw and replace it with the brass one.
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Rough Surface Gluing

If you find irregular surfaces at the glue line in wood projects, the problem can be moisture levels. This can happen, for example, when one piece has a 15% moisture content, while those next to it are at 8%. If you glue and plane boards with unequal moisture, those with higher moisture will eventually shrink more than those with less moisture.
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Thread Lube

Applying a little beeswax to the threads of wood screws can make driving them in much easier. The added lubricant can also reduce the potential for broken screws, especially if the screws you are using are of solid brass. You will find another big payback is that your cordless drill will be able to drive more screws per battery charge.
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Don’t Sand

To preserve that glowing quality wood gets with age, many pros suggest you not sand refinished wood (Refinishing floors is one exception). Of course, you may have to sand a piece that has been stripped with materials that have raised the grain or to remove imbedded wax or stearates.
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