Blade Height

Before turning on your table saw, make sure that the height of the saw blade is no more than 1/2-in. and no less than 1/8-in. above the surface of the workpiece. When setting the height of your table saw, you want to balance the need for safety with effectiveness. The goal is to leave as little exposed blade as possible while still being able to cleanly saw through the wood. When too much of the blade is exposed above the workpiece, friction is increased and the chance of chipping is greater. Also, the higher the blade height, the greater the severity of injury.
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Blade Radius

The width of your bandsaw blade and its tooth set will determine the smallest circle you can cut without damaging the blade or the saw guides. Generally a 3/16-in. blade will cut a radius as small as 5/16 in.; a 1/4-in. blade will cut as small as 5/8, and a 3/8-in. blade as small as 1-7/16. The wider a blade, the thicker it will be and the longer it will stand up and keep its edge.
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Drill Bit Corrosion

A simple way to clean corrosion from a twist drill bit is to let your power drill help you. While applying oil to the bit at its point of entry, drill repeatedly into a block of hardwood secured in a vise. Friction of the bit against the wood and abrasion of the wood chips will provide a scouring action to clean up the bit in a hurry.
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Glue Tools

An inexpensive nylon-bristle brush and a few small "acid" brushes that are sold for applying soldering flux can make great tools for spreading glue. Clipping off about half the paint brush bristles will make them stiff enough so they won't slop glue around on board edges or mitered joints.
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Planer-Joiner

Professional woodworkers buy quality tools capable of precision adjustments. Two tools which give them a leg up are the thinckness planer and planer/joiner. If you don't have these tools to help make sure your stock is perfectly dimensioned, try to find someone who has them and will dress up your project lumber for you. Chances are good that the wood you buy from the lumberyard will not be precisely square and true, and will need further processing if you are building a project to critical dimensions.
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Sizing Dowels

For a good joint, a fluted or spiraled dowel must fit snugly enough in the hole to allow the glue to come up around it. The dowel should reach to the bottom of the hole and be used with enough glue. For insurance, apply glue to both the sides of the hole and to the dowel itself.
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Tape Check

If you are working on a project with a partner and using two different measuring tapes, take the time to check that both tapes are in synch. Sometimes if the hook end of an older tape happens to get bent, it may throw off the measurement as much as a sixteenth of an inch. That error can be enough to cause problems if you need to do precision work. To doublecheck two metal measuring tapes for accuracy, mark a line at a certain distance on a board, draw the tapes out and compare readings.
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Recycled Wood Safety

One of the more dreaded occurrences for any woodworker is when a tool collides with a metal object in recycled wood. Before you start to cut, plane, or sand, be sure to thoroughly inspect the wood for metal objects such as nails or screws, especially if you are using power tools
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