Blade Balance

A sharp mower blade is a key to a perfect cutting job. However, whenever you sharpen a blade yourself, always check it for balance. An out-of-balance blade can cause excess mower vibration and wear. One way to check is to tie a metal washer onto a string, thread the string through the center hole of the blade, then hold the blade up with the washer supporting it. The washer should be on center and turned perpendicular to the blade. The blade should stay level. If it doesn't, grind it for balance on the back side of the blade. Always disconnect the lawnmower's sparkplug wire before removing or replacing any blade.
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Blade Radius

The width of your bandsaw blade and its tooth set will determine the smallest circle you can cut without damaging the blade or the saw guides. Generally a 3/16-in. blade will cut a radius as small as 5/16 in.; a 1/4-in. blade will cut as small as 5/8, and a 3/8-in. blade as small as 1-7/16. The wider a blade, the thicker it will be and the longer it will stand up and keep its edge.
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Drill Propeller

Shavings can pile up around a hole being drilled, making it hard for you to see what you are doing. To prevent this, push the point of the drill bit through a 4-in. strip of masking tape, then draw the tape up the bit so it will clear the work. Fold the strip lengthwise to bring the sticky sides together. The tape "wings" will act as a fan to clear the surface.
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Finding Center

You can use a rule to quickly find the center of a board's width without dealing with small fractions. Lay the rule across the width, keeping the scale's zero mark lined up with one side. Then angle the rule so that an even number lines up with the opposite side. Mark the board at half the distance. You can also find the center by drawing an "X" diagonally across from one set of opposite corners, then across from the other set of opposite corners. The exact center will be where the lines cross.
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Glue Split Wood

Hammering a nail close to the edge of a piece of a board may cause it to split. This problem can be solved by using the nail to open up the split, them filling the crack with glue. Wipe off any glue that runs over. Remove the nail, then clamp board as the glue dries. To avoid these splits in the future, use a drill to bore a pilot hold.
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Handsaw Re-Cut

If you're using a handsaw and find that a board you have just cut is 1/16 in. or 1/8 in. too long, here's a way to re-cut the board without making a mess of things. Find another board the same width and clamp it over the top of the board you want to trim. Then mark the cut line on the top board and make the cut. The kerf of the top board will keep the saw in line for a perfect cut below it.
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