Blade Breaks

If a bandsaw blade breaks, it can be brazed or welded. But check for the cause. The most common causes include: 1) misalignment or adjustment of the guides, 2) either forcing or twisting a wide blade around a curve, 3) feeding in the work too fast, 4) dull teeth or not enough tooth set, 5) excessive tightening of blade, 6) top guide set too high above work being cut, 7) using a blade with improperly finished braze or weld, and 8) continuously running the blade when it is not used for cutting.
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Hammer Types

What size do you need? Many experienced carpenters use a 16 oz. claw hammer for most jobs, but also carry a 20 or 22 oz. framing hammer for their heavier nailing jobs requiring big spikes. For lighter work, a 13 oz. curved claw hammer can be useful. Even a 7 oz. hammer will come in handy for smaller jobs like making picture frames.
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Sawing Posts

Say you're building a deck in your yard and have to cut a 10-in. thick post in half. How do you do this with a circular saw with just an 8-in. blade? Make matching straight cuts on opposite sides of the timber. Set the thickness guide to just over half the woods width.
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Cross Cuts

Cross cuts are cuts the go against the woodgrain. Once you've properly measured and marked your piece of wood, guide the side of the handsaw blade with the knuckle of your thumb. Start the cut by pulling your hand saw up two or three times, then push the saw blade forward at about a 45 degree angle. It is preferable to begin your cuts on the side of the wood that will show less when the project is complete.
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Drill Depth Indicator

When drilling a hole, such as for hardware in a cabinet, use a back-up board of a wood that is different in color from the wood you are drilling through. By doing this you will know immediately when the drill is all the way through the cabinet wood because the wood chips coming out will turn a different color.
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Finger Joints

Fingerjointing is a process in which short pieces of high grade wood are end glued together to make long lengths of stock. The advantages to this process are cost and availability of long lengths. Fingerjointed wood is used in a variety of applications including interior and exterior trim, moldings, and siding materials. In exterior applications, its one drawback is the way in which the different grains of the various pieces react to weather exposure. The individual pieces may telegraph their differences through the finish coat of paint giving a somewhat uneven or checkerboard appearance over time. Fingerjointing is a wonderful recycler of wood products if you give thought to where it can work best for you.
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Glue Sticks

There are several adhesive glue sticks to choose from for your hot glue gun. Here's a description of the most common to help you determine which is right for the project you're working on: 1) General purpose glue. Dries to a clear finish. Like its name, it's a good general purpose adhesive to have available. 2) Fast bonding glue. Will dry within 20 to 30 seconds after you apply it. 3) Wood glue. Specially formulated to bond with wood fibers. Dries to an opaque tan color. 4) Caulk/sealant. Formulated to resist heat, cold and moisture. Ideal for sealing windows, doors, and exterior surfaces. 5) Glass and ceramic adhesive. Dries almost instantly to a clear, almost invisible coat. 6) Decorative adhesive. Available in a variety of colors. Ideal for matching colors of your decorative craft project.
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Horseshoe Handle

Either a horseshoe used for pitching, or the real thing, can provide you a handy carrying device when moving cement blocks. To use, insert one prong into the block's hole; it will balance neatly on top of the prong. A 6-in. piece of rubber hose slit lengthwise and slipped over the other prong will give you a comfortable handle to grip.
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