Straight Wood

Before you glue up wood for a project, examine the parts. If at all possible, start out with cleanly cut, perfectly straight boards of the proper thickness. Take out any bow or warp before you begin your gluing work. By using straight and true stock, you won't have to force the boards in one direction or another, and you won't have to get into tricky, complicated clamping set-ups.
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Drying Glue

Do you have any chairs, tables, or other wooden furniture that are a little wobbly due to the glue drying out? Here's how you can tighten things up. First, disassemble the joined pieces. Clean off all of the old glue and dirt with warm vinegar. Rinse with clean water, and let everything dry completely. Use yellow carpenters glue to reassemble all the pieces back together.
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Cross Cuts

Cross cuts are cuts the go against the woodgrain. Once you've properly measured and marked your piece of wood, guide the side of the handsaw blade with the knuckle of your thumb. Start the cut by pulling your hand saw up two or three times, then push the saw blade forward at about a 45 degree angle. It is preferable to begin your cuts on the side of the wood that will show less when the project is complete.
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Decorative Molding

A way to get a good fit when installing decorative molding is to install the first piece with a square end. Then cut the second piece at a 45-degree angle in a miter box or saw to expose the profile. Use a coping saw and follow the edge of the profile, under-cutting it about 3 degrees. This lets you get a good fit, even if the corner is not perfectly square.
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Hot Glue Fix

One problem in using older-style pegboard hooks is that they tend to pull out when the tools are removed. One way you can solve the problem is to insert them into the pegboard and use a hot glue gun to fasten them in place. In a minute or so the hooks will be fixed in place, although you will be able to wrestle them loose whenever you want to rearrange your tool storage. Another solution is to buy newer-style hooks that will lock in place with just the turn of a screwdriver.
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Read Twice

When measuring, the old adage "measure twice and cut once" can be excellent advice. Pros, however, have their own variation; they usually only measure once, but then will read the measurement twice. They will mark the cut line, then cut the wood just so the saw kerf is touching the line.
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Blade Choices

You should choose a handsaw based on the type and size of wood you're cutting, and the direction of the cut - either cross cutting (cutting across the grain) or ripping (cutting with the grain).

Saws with fewer teeth per inch provide a faster, but rougher cut and are generally used for "ripping" wood, cutting in the same direction as the grain. The teeth of these rip saws are filed differently than the teeth of a cross cut blade to take advantage of the type of grain in the wood.

Cross cut saws are used for cutting across the grain and have finer teeth, usually from eight to 15 teeth per inch. When cutting thicker pieces, a saw with more teeth per inch may produce more debris than it can handle and possibly clog the cut and slow the cutting process. This can be avoided by using an old candle or paraffin wax and rubbing the blade to make it cut more smoothly through the wood. Remember to hold the saw straight in the cut so it doesn't stick.
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