Touting Tung Oil

Most dedicated wood lovers insist that the best finish for a wood floor is a floor-formulated tung oil. Derived from the nut of the tung tree, tung oil penetrates the wood and bonds with the surface fibers. More giving than a synthetic finish, a tung-oiled floor will evolve with wear rather than cracking or chipping. Originally developed as as ship sealant, tung oil naturally provides excellent protection from spills, water, traffic, and dirt. Cleanup is simple, with a little clear vinegar in water or an oil soap mixed with water.
Read More

Blade Reverse

If, when mounting a bandsaw blade, the saw teeth are pointing up instead of down, don't panic. Chances are that the saw blade got twisted inside out as it was uncoiled. To remedy, just twist the saw blade right-side out and it will mount correctly. Watch for this, especially when you are mounting a metal-cutting blade which has small teeth. If used upside down it will cut poorly and the teeth can lose their edge quickly.
Read More

Clamp-On Storage

Have a rather large collection of adjustable wrenches, c-clamps or odd-shaped screw clamps laying around the workshop? You can store them neatly side by side just by tightening up their jaws on the edge or lip of a shelf that is out of the way. They will take up very little room and will always be easy to spot and retrieve. If the ceiling joists are accessible in your shop, they also can be used for clamp-on storage.
Read More

Hand Filing

When using hand files, it is best to hold the stock firmly in a vise or clamp. For better results, try to keep the stock being filed at about elbow height. For heavier filing work, the stock should be lower; if the work is finer, try to keep it up closer to eye level.
Read More

Handsaw Re-Cut

If you're using a handsaw and find that a board you have just cut is 1/16 in. or 1/8 in. too long, here's a way to re-cut the board without making a mess of things. Find another board the same width and clamp it over the top of the board you want to trim. Then mark the cut line on the top board and make the cut. The kerf of the top board will keep the saw in line for a perfect cut below it.
Read More

Project Boxes

When assembling furniture or other larger projects, some pros don't use either the tops of their workbenches or the floor. Instead, they use two or more wooden boxes about 18 in. high, 24 in. wide and 32 in. long, set upside-down on the floor to span the project's length. The project boxes don't need to be fancy, just provide enough height to cut down on back strain. The boxes can also be stacked, or set on their sides or ends, to provide for varying heights.
Read More

Save Your Sand Paper

Get more life out of your sanding paper. After you've used an abrasive a few times, debris will become embedded in the tiny grit particles. This may reduce the effectiveness of the abrasive, but not necessarily mean that you need to replace it. There is a "abrasive eraser" available that will work to remove the particles and restore sanding power back to your sanding sheets, belts, disks, or drums.
Read More

Measuring Square

A measuring or rafter square is a great addition to any tool box. You can use it to mark a board for square or angled cuts. It fits securely into a tool belt and can be used to check the trueness of an angle or as a cutting guide for a circular saw. It's also handy when you're working with large-dimensional lumber or when you're laying out rafters.
Read More

Tool Clean-Up

For cleaning accumulated sawdust and wood resins from tools, use warm soapy water with a stiff scrub brush. If resin is a problem, you can try a solution of ammonia and warm water, but only soak parts in the solution a short time since it can cause them to rust. For grease or oil, soak parts in a good safety solvent.
Read More