Surface Drag

If any of your woodworking tools seem to be losing their zip, make sure they aren't suffering from surface drag instead of a dull blade. Rubbing a thin coat of paste wax or paraffin on the top surfaces of tools like tablesaws, planers or jointers, or onto the sole plates of portable tools like circular saws, sabersaws or even hand planes, can make a big difference in how they perform.
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Workbench Height

When setting up workbenches, the height is generally figured at about hip pocket high. But before you buy or build a workbench, consider the height of your tablesaw. If the bench is the same height as the saw it can then be used for extra support when sawing over-size materials.
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Miter Box Saver

If you just bought a manual miter box, a simple modification will extend its useful service life. Insert and fasten a piece of 1x stock to the inside bottom of the box. The saw blade will then cut into the false bottom, without damaging the miter box itself. Occasionally move the wood back and forth, or turn it over, to spread out the wear. When badly cut up, just replace the piece.
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Tape Check

If you are working on a project with a partner and using two different measuring tapes, take the time to check that both tapes are in synch. Sometimes if the hook end of an older tape happens to get bent, it may throw off the measurement as much as a sixteenth of an inch. That error can be enough to cause problems if you need to do precision work. To doublecheck two metal measuring tapes for accuracy, mark a line at a certain distance on a board, draw the tapes out and compare readings.
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Blade Breaks

If a bandsaw blade breaks, it can be brazed or welded. But check for the cause. The most common causes include: 1) misalignment or adjustment of the guides, 2) either forcing or twisting a wide blade around a curve, 3) feeding in the work too fast, 4) dull teeth or not enough tooth set, 5) excessive tightening of blade, 6) top guide set too high above work being cut, 7) using a blade with improperly finished braze or weld, and 8) continuously running the blade when it is not used for cutting.
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Part Pick-Up

If you will be building something which uses small parts produced on your tablesaw, you can let your shop vacuum pick up the pieces for you. It's fast, efficient, and safer than getting your hand close to the blade. Clean out the vac, then wire or clamp the suction hose so that the small pieces are drawn in as you do your cutting. Then, when you are done, simply open up the vac and collect the parts.
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Thread Lube

Applying a little beeswax to the threads of wood screws can make driving them in much easier. The added lubricant can also reduce the potential for broken screws, especially if the screws you are using are of solid brass. You will find another big payback is that your cordless drill will be able to drive more screws per battery charge.
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Blade Helpers

If you are about to change the blade on your bandsaw, dig out your small spring clamps to make the job easier. A new bandsaw blade can have a tendency to slip off of the top wheel while you try to get it on the lower wheel. Use a pair of small clamps to hold the blade on the top wheel while you slip it over the lower wheel and apply tension. Remove the clamps from the wheel before you begin making final adjustments.
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Plane Fix

If you drop one of your favorite steel planes and dent the sole, metal displaced from the dent will likely leave a raised ring around it that can scratch wood. Simply rub the surface with a fine honing stone to remove the raised area. Once done, you can ignore the remaining dent, oil the unplated surface, and put the plane back to work.
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