Blade Nicks

If your jointer or planer knives get a nick or two, they may still have lots of life in them. Simply stagger the knives as needed. The good knives will clean up the raised lines left by the nicked knives. Before turning the power back on, make sure all blades spin freely.
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Clamp Pads

Professional woodworkers often don't use pads on their clamps because they know how to set them up without marring the wood. But if you prefer to use them for pipe or bar clamps, you can buy some or make up your own. Scrap rubber, shoe soles, even old mud flaps, can do the trick. For pipe clamps, cut out a slightly undersize circle to fit over the pipe using a sabersaw. Next, cut out the perimeter about 1/8 in. oversize. Then make a slit in the pad bottom so it can stretch over the pipe without taking off the jaw end.
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Faster Sanding

The big secret in finishing wood is in the sanding. To speed up the sanding of flat surfaces when using a vibrating sander, some pros will insert two sheets of sandpaper into the sander at the same time. Then, when the top layer becomes either worn or ripped, they simply tear it off and the second layer of sandpaper is already in place.
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Hammer Check

If you will be working in close quarters attaching new molding to walls or ceilings with finishing nails, first check out your hammer handle. Inevitably the handle end will hit the adjacent surface in spots. Either use a new hammer, clean up the handle of an older hammer, or mask the end of the handle with masking tape, especially if the handle has an older covering of black rubberized material. Doing this before you start can save you time that otherwise would be spent cleaning up or repainting over the scuff marks.
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Problem Solvers

Often a project can go well except for one thing. A single screw, for example, that doesn't want to go in, or time wasted constantly changing drill bits, can hang up an otherwise perfect project. Investing in specialty tools like those shown here can solve typical problems to help get jobs done right with less time and effort.
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Toenailing

Toenailing styles can vary. Some pros like to drive three or four nails into a stud, toenailing from both sides at about a 30-degree angle. The job is easier if you first drive a holding nail on one side of the stud, then drive two nails on the opposite side. Remove the holding nail, then toenail the second side. You can also make up a 2x4 spacer to place between the studs.
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Touting Tung Oil

Most dedicated wood lovers insist that the best finish for a wood floor is a floor-formulated tung oil. Derived from the nut of the tung tree, tung oil penetrates the wood and bonds with the surface fibers. More giving than a synthetic finish, a tung-oiled floor will evolve with wear rather than cracking or chipping. Originally developed as as ship sealant, tung oil naturally provides excellent protection from spills, water, traffic, and dirt. Cleanup is simple, with a little clear vinegar in water or an oil soap mixed with water.
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