Carpet Padding

When purchasing carpeting, you should buy the best-quality carpet you can afford, coupled with the highest quality padding. In fact, the padding that goes between the carpeting and the subflooring is as important as the choice of carpeting itself. Padding provides softness and support, cuts down on noise and insulates the floor. Often referred to as "underlay" or "cushion," padding thickness depends on the pile of the carpet above it. Padding should be no thicker than 7/16 inch, even for a very deep pile carpet. Too much cushion can actually void a manufacturer's warranty; so, take the time to find the padding that is right for your new carpet.
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Drawknife and Spokeshave

When rounding out your workshop tools, consider adding two of the handiest tools used in shops of old-timers: a drawknife and a spokeshave. For the occasional job a drawknife can be used instead of the router for beveling work. It's fast and it can make fine cuts without any chatter marks. A spokeshave is like a plane with handles, making it easy to control the depth of cut for a perfect surface.
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Deck Lumber

When building a deck or other outdoor platform, don't use lumber wider than 6 inches. Ponding water on wide boards can lead to eventual cupping problems. For example, use two 2x6's instead of one 2x12. Pros advise installing the boards crown-side up to help minimize cupping and shelling of grain layers.
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Drywall Joints

As a final check when taping drywall joints, use a side light to check for smoothness. The light can be a halogen worklight, a troublelight, a lamp without a shade, even a larger flashlight. Hold the light close to the wall next to the joints in several places to reveal high and low spots, or bumps and depressions, that otherwise would be easily missed.
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Part Retriever

When you are working in an area where a washer or nut can drop into a delicate assembly or be difficult to retrieve, use dental floss. Fasten one end of a long piece of floss to the part and the other end to something solid. When the parts are finally installed, the dental floss can either be cut off or, as in the case of a nut, it will come right off because it will be cut by the threading action.
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Glue Types

There are a many choices to make when choosing glue. Here are some of the most common: 1) White glue is the most popular choice for general purpose adhering. It's non-toxic, odorless, nonflammable and dries clear in under an hour. One drawback of white glue is that is has a low resistance to water, so it should not be used for outdoor projects. 2) Yellow carpenter's glue sets quicker and is more resistant to water than white glue. It won't be affected by solvents used in woodworking such as varnish, lacquer, or paint. Yellow glue dries to a translucent finish but can be sanded. 3) Hot-melt glue is applied with a glue gun. It sets almost instantly on wood, metal, cloth, and ceramics. There are several formulas available for you to match to your project. Hot-melt glues, however, do not adhere well to cold surfaces, so make sure that your workpieces are not cold. 4) Instant bonding glue is incredibly strong and sets almost instantly. It is ideal for non-porous surfaces such as glass, certain plastics, ceramics, and metal but can also be used to bond wood and paper as well. If you should accidentally drip some onto your skin, use nail polish remover to dissolve it. Instant bonding glue will dry inside the container very quickly so be sure to tightly replace the glue container's cap as soon as possible.
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