Broken Screws

There's a solution for dealing with wood screws which have broken off below the surface of the wood. If you don't want to risk damaging the wood by digging it out, try driving the screw deeper into the wood with a nail set. Then just fill the hole with a wood filler, and drive a new screw next to the broken one.
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Finger Joints

Fingerjointing is a process in which short pieces of high grade wood are end glued together to make long lengths of stock. The advantages to this process are cost and availability of long lengths. Fingerjointed wood is used in a variety of applications including interior and exterior trim, moldings, and siding materials. In exterior applications, its one drawback is the way in which the different grains of the various pieces react to weather exposure. The individual pieces may telegraph their differences through the finish coat of paint giving a somewhat uneven or checkerboard appearance over time. Fingerjointing is a wonderful recycler of wood products if you give thought to where it can work best for you.
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Nailset

When a smooth, finished appearance is necessary, stop hammering the finishing nail approximately 1/8 of an inch above the surface. Then place a nailset onto the tip of the nail head and set it into the surface with a couple of sharp taps.
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Quick Line

Carpenters who do rough construction get very proficient at "close-enough" measuring. For example, to quickly draw a line parallel to the edge of a board, you can place a pencil at the end of a combination square and move both the square and pencil along the board. Some combination squares have a hole in the blade for this purpose.
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Saw Maintenance

Handsaws are designed to provide years of good service. However, by wiping the entire surface of the saw blade with an oily rag, you will maximize your saw's performance and extend its life. Many hand saws come with a protective tooth cover. Don't throw this away. It will protect the teeth from any harm that could occur in a busy workshop. If you can't find this cover, cut and slice open an old garden hose and use it to cover the entire length the blade.
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Square It

If you'd like your project to turn out as strong, solid, and lasting as if a professional woodworker built it, do what they do...use your tri-square to check for squareness after each cross cut. Edges on boards that will be edge-joined must be absolutely square, so carefully check all sides. If a cut is not exactly square, use a block plane to trim. It takes a little extra time, but the improved results will be well worth it.
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Triangle Trick

When dry-fitting boards to be glued up later, here's a trick to help you make sure you will be able to get them back together in the right order. After the boards are in the desired position, draw a triangle large enough to cover all the boards of the section. Later, before clamping, just re-create the triangle as you assemble the boards.
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