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Pointing the Finger of Blame

 
Pointing the finger at someone else seem to be very de rigueur these days. It seems the "drive-by" media's next target is the home appraiser. It's really just one more way to blame someone else. In my opinion, a house should not need an appraisal. An appraisal is for the bank. A house is worth whatever someone is willing to pay and someone else is willing to sell it for. You donít even need an appraisal if you are not getting a loan. Should an appraisal be paid for by the borrower or the lending institution as it is only there to protect the bank from losing money? Buyers donít pay for an appraisal on a car, a vacation package or an appliance as they are priced at what the market will tolerate. They are worth exactly what someone is willing to pay for them. It's basic business; things are worth what you can sell them for at that particular point in time.

Homes are worth less now than they were last year, which is not the historical trend but, if you bought gold today, it is not set that you can sell it for the same tomorrow. Tell us what you think of blaming the appraiser and who do you think will get the blame next?




Photo courtesy of jalalspages.

When Rays Attack

 
Over time, exposure to the Sun can damage furniture, carpets and artwork. But you can protect your possessions from the Sun's harmful rays with solar protection window film from companies such as CHB Industries. This protective film blocks 98 percent of ultraviolet rays. It also cuts down on heating and cooling costs. In the summer, the film can keep the house up to 65 percent cooler by protecting against solar heat gain. In the winter, the film acts as insulation and reduces heat loss by up to 15 percent. Put it in place before the pictures on your walls turn a pale blue.



Photo courtesy of TheTruthAbout.

Status of the Housing Crisis

 
Are housing prices close to bottoming out? According to this article in the New York Times, no. The reporter attended a foreclosure auction and found homes selling for a fraction of their former price. Some economists are predicting the foreclosure rate to keep rising and credit for mortgages to continue to dry up. Despite this, others are saying the price is close to stabilizing. They point to home values, rental costs and incomes to determine homes are only overvalued by 10 percent.







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