Job Type:

Zip Code:




Home > MyProjects > Step By Step > Kitchen > How to Install a Removable Tile Mural Backsplash

How to Install a Removable Tile Mural Backsplash

By: lindapaul
Filed Under: Kitchen as Step By Step
Last Modified: 05/07/2009 02:29 PM
Print VersionBookmarkEmail this page to a friend.
Report project?
this tile mural was installed as a removable backsplash
[+] enlarge image

this tile mural was installed as a removable backsplash

Installation of ready to Hang, removable backsplashes


If your are renting just want to or want to take your tile mural with you move ,you might want to consider mounting your mural backsplash so that it can be removed at a later date . This is easy to do and you don't have to use grout! You can take your beautiful mural with you when you move. Mural is available at http://www.lindapaul.com/ceramic_tile_wall_murals_&_backsplash.htm

here are the steps.

Materials Needed:
- A 3/8" mdf board cut to the size of your mural
- 4 oz tube of liquid nails or 10 minute epoxy
- 4 butterfly wall anchors
-drill

step 1 - Plan your space:
1. Plan your space:
Once you have all of your tiles, lay them out and measure the exact width and height. Using framing tile is recommended as it hides the installation wall anchors so the mural can be removed at a later date. If you buy the frame tiles that have a hollow underside, these will hide the screws that hold the mural to the wall.
Cut Board and lay out tile
[+] enlarge image

Cut Board and lay out tile

Step 2 - Cut a Board to Fit


2. Cut your Board
Cut a 3/8" mdf board (available at Home Depot or Lowe's) to the exact size of the mural and surrounding framing tile. Make sure your board is flat. Once the board is cut, hold it up on the wall where you want you mural to be and draw a line around it on the wall
lay out tiles on board
[+] enlarge image

lay out tiles on board

Step 3 - Line Up The Tiles


3. Line up the tiles
On a flat surface, place the mural tiles and framing tiles on the board and line everything up. Remove the framing tiles and draw a line around just the mural. Then mark where the edge of each framing tile is on the board.
Drill a hole in each of the four corners large enough to accommodate the butterfly wall anchors (3/8" to 1/2")

Step 4 - Glueing the Tiles to the board


4. Gluing the tiles onto the board

Using the liquid nails or a 10 minute epoxy, glue the mural tiles onto the board and let dry.

Next, you will glue on the framing tiles leaving off the four corner framing tiles (as is the step 5 picture) so that you can attach the board to the wall. Let dry overnight.
mounting mural on the wall
[+] enlarge image

mounting mural on the wall

Step 5 - Attaching The Board to the wall


5. Attaching the board to the wall
You will need two people for this step. Holding the board up the the wall , mark the drill hole locations for the 4 anchors on the wall. Drill four holes and make sure they are large enough to accommodate the anchors. Holding the board in place screw the board to the wall using the butterfly anchors. Note: these murals are heavy, do use any other kind of anchor unless you are placing screws directly into a wall stud.
corner of mural before last framing tile is placed
[+] enlarge image

corner of mural before last framing tile is placed

Step 6 -


6. Glue the four corner tiles
Finally, you will glue on the four corner framing tiles. Use a very small amount of the glue so that these tiles can be popped off at a later date and the mural relocated. Its a good idea to buy extra framing tiles in case you break one.

see pictures of Installed Kitchen backsplashes and ceramic tile murals at
http://www.lindapaul.com/Decorative_tile_Kitchen_Decorating_ideas.htm
The Vineyard mural by artist Linda Paul
[+] enlarge image

The Vineyard mural by artist Linda Paul

Another picture of a removable kitchen backsplash mural



Discussion

Post Reply
Title/Content Author

How do I grout or caulk this?

06/07/2009 02:04 PM tilefan

How do I grout or caulk this to prevent splatter from getting in between the tiles and to create a more uniform, traditional tile backsplash look with an 1/8" or 1/4" joint? I'm looking for the least complicated, least messy option.

Thanks!

Member Since
06/07/2009

Total Contributions
1

Post Reply

grouting your backsplash

06/08/2009 10:18 AM lindapaul

You certainly can use grout. I would not use more than an 1/8" grout space as it will breakup the picture too much.

Once you have glued all the tiles to the board. Let them cure 24 hours before grouting

- Start with a small section (12 tiles or so)

- Remove all tile spacers

- Dampen the tiles with water and a clean sponge (small kitchen sponge works well)

Apply just enough grout to fill the spaces (joints) between the tiles. Do not cover the entire surface of the mural with grout. (Tip from Linda Paul - use a small flat plastic trowel to place grout on the end of the float)

Holding the rubber float at a 45 degree angle, push the grout into the spaces between the tiles until they are filled.

Remove excess grout using the edge of the float at a 90 degree angle. Be sure to clean out any grout that gets into the surface pits of the tiles (it will not come out if it dries and can ruin the look of your mural)

Clean any excess grout off the tiles using a clean sponge and clean water, avoiding the grout lines.

For smooth joints: use the end of your finger.
or
for a textured rustic look: Take the sponge and pat the grout lines. Itís a great look with the tumbled stone.

Clean the tiles with the edge of the sponge until they look clean! (Not hazy) If there is haze, you can remove it several hours later.

Linda Paul
www.lindapaul.com

Member Since
05/07/2009

Total Contributions
1

Post Reply
  Post Reply



About  | FAQ  | Contact  | Sitemap  | Privacy Policy  | Terms of Use  | Help

© 2014 Renovate Your World LLC