How to Install Shutters

Difficulty: 2 of 5

 

Shutters add a rich detail and character to your home while protecting your windows from damaging winds and rain.

 

Be careful when setting up ladders to install the shutters. Make sure that the ladder is on solid, flat, even ground. Carefully follow the manufacturer’s instructions for the safe use of ladders. If you think you need it, get help when installing shutters.

Materials:

– Drill
– Drill bit, 1/16-inch
– Drill bit, phillips
– Ladder
– Pencil
– Screw gun
– Shutters
– Tape measure
– Wrench, 9/16-inch

Step 1: Measure for the new shutters.


Determine how many pairs of shutters you will need, as well as the size of the shutters you will need for each window. Real, operable shutters are the same height as the window and half as wide, with the two shutters totaling the width of the window. Measure the width across the inside of the window casing. If the windows have a small, raised molding to support the window screen, measure just to the outside of the screen molding. In the same manner, measure the height of the window from the inside of the bottom of the casing to the inside of the top of the casing. Double-check to make sure all the windows are the same size. Often, upper windows are slightly smaller.

Measure the width to the outside of the screen molding, if applicable.

Step 2: Purchase the new shutters.


There are many types of shutters you can install, from inexpensive, molded plastic panels to custom-built, historical reproduction wooden shutters that are very beautiful but also can be expensive. The J & L Shutters chosen for this installation are historically correct and fully functional, but they are made of modern Permex™, a synthetic material that combines the architectural advantages of wood shutters with the weathering advantages of Permex™. Permex™ shutters will not rot and have a lifetime warranty against manufacturing defects as well as a 10-year guarantee against paint defects.

These Permex shutters are historically accurate and durable.

Step 3: Lay out the shutter parts and gather the tools.


When the shutters arrive, lay the first set out on a large workspace. Make sure you have all the parts and that nothing was damaged or lost in shipping. There are many hinges and latches to attach, so a screw gun is needed. You will also need a drill for pilot holes and a 9/16-inch wrench for installing the metal latch and shutter dog. Before you start, read the manufacturer’s instructions carefully and check to ensure you have everything you need.

Lay the first set of shutters out on a workspace.

Step 4: Position the hinge plates.


Lay out a pair of shutters with the inside of the shutters facing up as if you were looking out through the window at the closed shutters. Following the directions, orient the hinge plates along the top and bottom outside corners of the shutters. On traditional shutters, the bottom stile, or panel, is usually wider than the top stile.
Slide the hinge plates under the shutter along the top and bottom outside corners.

Step 5: Mark the location of the pilot holes for the hinge plates.


With the hinges correctly oriented, flip the shutter over. Align the hinge plate square with the corner of the shutter. Then, using a pencil, mark the locations for each of the screws. Do the same with the top hinge.

Use a pencil to mark the location of the pilot holes.

Step 6: Drill pilot holes for the hinge plates.


Use one of the hinge screws to determine how deep the pilot holes need to be. Using a 1/16-inch drill bit, drill a pilot hole for each of the hinge plates. Use a sharp bit because you will be drilling through the steel reinforcement molded into the frame of the Permex™ material for some of the holes.

Use a sharp 1/16-inch bit to drill the pilot holes.

Step 7: Fasten the hinge plates to the shutter.


Using a Phillips bit, fasten the hinge plates to the shutters.
Use a Phillips bit to screw the hinge plate to the shutter.

Step 8: Fasten the hinge plates for the matching shutter.


Following steps #4 to #7, fasten the hinge plates on the matching shutter.
Drill pilot holes for the hinge plates on the matching shutter.

Step 9: Drill pilot holes for the shutter fastener clip.


Center the shutter fastener clip on the outside edge of the middle stile. Mark the locations for the screws. Once located, drill pilot holes for the screws.

Mark locations for the fastener clip pilot holes and drill the holes.

Step 10: Fasten the clip into place.


Use the screw gun to fasten the clip in place. Do the same with the fastener on the matching shutter.

Screw the shutter fastener clip into place.

Step 11: Clip the steel clasp into place.


On these shutters, there is a stainless-steel clasp that needs to be screwed together with its fastener. Assemble the steel clasp and clip it into the shutter fastener clip so they stay together. The clasp will be screwed into the siding later.
Clip the steel clasp into the shutter fastener clip.

Step 12: Measure the distance between the top of the shutter to the top of the pintle hinge plate.


Measure the distance between the top of the shutter to the top of the pintle hinge plate.
The top of the pintle hinge plate is indicated by the thumb.

Step 13: Measure the distance between the top of the shutter to the top of the bottom pintle hinge plate.


Measure the distance between the top of the shutter to the top of the bottom pintle hinge plate.
Record the measurement between the top of the shutter to the top of the bottom pintle hinge plate.

Step 14: Measure from the top casing to the top of the pintle hinge plate.


Moving to the top casing, mark the point down from the top casing that indicates the distance recorded in step #12, the distance between the top of the shutter to the top of the pintle hinge plate.
Mark the location.

Step 15: Mark the location for the bottom pintle hinge plate.


Similar to step #14, transfer the distance between the top of the shutter and the top of the bottom pintle to the bottom casing of the window.
Transfer the measurement to the bottom casing.

Step 16: Mark the locations for the pilot holes.


Line up the mark for the top pintle hinge plate with the upper mark. Using the holes in the pintle plate as a guide, mark the location for the fasteners. Following the same process, line up the top of the pintle of the lower hinge plate with the mark on the casing and mark the location for the fasteners.

Mark the location for pilot holes for the top pintle hinge plate. Repeat for the bottom.

Step 17: Drill pilot holes for the pintle plate fasteners.


Using a 1/16-inch drill bit, drill pilot holes for the upper pintle plate fasteners. Repeat for the lower pintle plate fasteners.

Drill pilot holes.

Step 18: Fasten the hinge plates to the window casing.


Using the fasteners that came with the hinge plates, fasten the upper hinge plate to the window casing. Do the same with the lower hinge plate.

Fasten the hinge plate to the casing.

Step 19: Attach the shutters to the pintle hinges.


Carefully lift the shutter into place, lining up the upper and lower with the hinges. Using a twisting motion, slide the pintles into place.

Use a twisting motion to slide the pintles into place.

Step 20: Mark the location for the fastener clasp clip and drill a pilot hole.


With the fastener clipped into the clasp, open the shutter. Tap the shutter to make a mark in the side of the house. The screw of the fastener will mark the location for the hole. Drill a pilot hole that is the size of the fastener into the siding. It’s a good idea to ream out the hole as you drill so that the fastener will not crack the siding over time, particularly during drier times of the year.

Drill a pilot hole where the clasp hits the siding.

Step 21: Attach the fastener to the siding.


Start screwing in the fastener by hand then tighten it into place with a 9/16-inch wrench. Test the alignment of the fastener. Because of our alignment technique, it should fit perfectly.

Test the alignment of the installed fastener.

Step 22: Drill a pilot hole for the


The last step is to attach the “dog,” the traditional latch for shutters. Find the center of the shutter and drill a 3/8-inch pilot hole about an inch under the bottom of the shutter. This measurement is flexible. Don’t drill a pilot hole through the bottom half-inch of clapboard or a shingle or it will split. Pick a location that places the lag bolt for the dog into solid siding.

Drill a pilot hole for the dog.

Step 23: Install the dog.


A traditional dog is weighted so that the heavier, lower side ensures that the latch lies perpendicular with the shutter, holding it in place. The dog should be adjusted so that it lightly touches the open shutter. With the dog in place, the shutter is mounted.
Use a wrench to install the dog until it can hold the shutter in place.

Step 24: Install all the shutters.


Follow the above steps to install the remainder of the shutters. Once you become comfortable with the installation process and have your measurements worked out, you may find it faster to install all the shutter hardware first and then install all the shutters to the casing, which significantly shortens the process. Whatever assembly method you choose, the results will be stunning. Functional shutters add wonderful detail, value and elegance to your home and will be a source of great personal satisfaction for years to come.

Install the rest of the shutters.