How to Install a Tankless Water Heater

Difficulty: 4 of 5

 

More and more people are incorporating energy-efficient, or “green,” technologies into their homes. These technologies deliver substantial energy savings and reduce monthly utility costs without sacrificing lifestyle. An example of this type of green technology is the Rinnai Tankless Water Heater.

 

It is recommended that tankless heaters be installed by a registered professional who has gone through an extensive installation training course to ensure proper installation and service.

Materials:

Step 1: Installing a Tankless Water Heater


More and more, people are incorporating energy-efficient, or “green,” technologies into their homes. These technologies deliver substantial energy savings and reduce monthly utility costs without sacrificing lifestyle.

An example of this type of green technology is the Rinnai tankless water heater.

Tankless water heaters are natural or propane gas-fired units that replace old-fashioned hot water storage tanks.

Traditionally, hot water storage tanks hold a large amount of water, continuously heating and reheating the water around the clock—no matter whether hot water is needed or not.

These water heaters can leak and rupture. A leak could spill gallons of extremely hot water, flooding home furnishings and carpets, damaging the surrounding area.

In contrast, tankless water heaters hold no water, so there is nothing that can leak.

Tankless water only make hot water when it’s called for.

When you open a hot water tap the flow sensor recognizes the demand and the unit begins delivering a continuous source of hot water.

When you close the hot water tap the unit shuts off, eliminating standby loss and conserving a substantial amount of energy.

It’s recommended that tankless heaters be installed by a registered professional who has gone through an extensive installation training course, to ensure proper installation and service. Installation takes about 4 to 6 hours.

This tankless water heater units come in two designs: either self-contained weatherproof units for outside the home or wall-mounted for the home.

This inside unit is 9 inches deep, 14 inches wide and 24 inches high. It’s easily concealed and much smaller than the traditional tank heater, which takes up valuable floor space.

Additional parts of the installation include attaching the hot and cold piping, installing the propane or main gas line, installing the electrical supply and control wiring, and installing and connecting the concentric direct vent exhaust system, eliminating the need for any additional ventilation or blowers for proper venting.

Some tankless heaters include a remote digital control panel. This panel allows you to remotely adjust the temperature of your hot water from your bathroom, laundry room or kitchen.

This feature allows you to set a lower temperature, for instance, to protect against scalding if you have small children or older individuals in your home.

Within hours, the tankless heater is installed and is ready for service. With an expected lifespan of up to 20 years and delivering all the hot water you need, when you need it, you’ll never take a cold shower again.